Published On: Tue, May 15th, 2018

Roasted fennel and broccoli quiche

Quiches are the perfect summer food for picnics and al fresco lunches, and this hearty broccoli and roasted fennel quiche is just the thing to make for those warmer days. Best served with a cold glass of white wine! 

Vegan quiche

Vegan roasted fennel and broccoli quiche

Recipe by Richard Church (www.richardchurchphoto.com)

Prep time: 30 minutes | Chill time: 1 hour | Cooking time: 1 hour

Ingredients

For the Pastry:

  • 200g soya flour
  • 200g coconut flour (or gluten-free alternative)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp xanthan gum
  • 150g vegan margarine, plus extra for greasing
  • 150-200ml almond milk (or dairy-free alternative)

For the Filling:

  • 2 fennel bulbs, stalks and base cut off and leaves separated
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, unpeeled
  • 150g cashew nuts, soaked in hot water for 20 minutes, then drained
  • 200g hummus
  • 100ml dairy-free cream
  • 100g plain dairy-free yoghurt
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 large head of broccoli, cut into small florets.

For the Béchamel:

  • 150ml dairy-free cream
  • 75g grated vegan cheese
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast

Method

  1. First make your pastry. Combine the two flours, baking powder, salt and xanthan gum in a mixing bowl and rub in your margarine until you get fine breadcrumbs. Pour in the milk and bring the dough together with your hands. You are looking for a soft dough mix that isn’t too wet. Knead for a minute and then cover and place in the fridge for an hour.
  2. Preheat the oven to gas 6/200C/400F. Put the fennel and garlic bulbs on a baking tray and drizzle over the olive oil, then use your hands to make sure all the fennel and garlic are covered with the oil. Place at the top of the oven for 15 minutes, until the edges of the fennel start to brown.
  3. Grease a 9 inch, loose bottomed tart tin with margarine and take your pastry out of the fridge. Dust a surface with the soya flour and roll the dough out large enough to cover the tin and sides. It’s quite a crumbly pastry, so if you are having trouble at this point then you can place it into the tin a bit at a time and press it down with your fingers. Once you have lined the tin with the pastry, cut a sheet of greaseproof paper and press on top of the pastry, then pour baking beans or dry rice onto the paper. Place in the middle of the oven for 10-15 minutes to cook the pastry.
  4. Once cooked, remove from the oven. Carefully remove the paper with the baking beans and allow to cool.
  5. Turn the oven down to gas 5/190C/375F
  6. Now make the filling. Place the drained cashews, hummus, cream and yoghurt into a blender and puree until smooth. Empty the mixture into a large bowl and season to taste. Discard the garlic from the fennel and place the fennel and the broccoli into the mixing bowl with the pureed mixture. Combine and pour into your pastry crust.
  7. Make the béchamel. Heat the cream in a small pan and add the grated cheese and nutritional yeast. Cook for a few minutes until the cheese is melted and the sauce thickens, then pour over the top of your quiche.
  8. Dust with ground paprika and bake on the bottom of the oven for 45 – 55 minutes, until golden brown and firm. Leave for at least 15 minutes before serving.

Original recipe here

 

Going Vegan by Richard Church, features over 100 plant-based recipes, many of which are gluten-free, as well as advice for the new and established vegan. 

Going Vegan is available to purchase on Amazon


About the author

Richard Church is a portrait photographer and plant-based food blogger living and working in London. He’s been passionate about food since he was thirteen years old, when he made his first pizza from a cookbook. In the spring of 2014, he decided on a whim to go vegan. Richard was a voracious meat eater up until then and thought he would last about 2 weeks before giving up. But he’s never looked back…

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