Yves Saint Laurent and Brioni ditch fur making Kering Group fully fur-free

Author: Helen Greaves

Read Time:   |  27th September 2021

Global fashion giant Kering Group has announced that it will go completely fur-free as its final fashion brands, Yves Saint Laurent and Brioni, pledge to ditch fur.

One of the world’s largest luxury fashion companies, Kering Group, has announced that it is going completely fur-free starting from the group’s Fall 2022 collections.

Kering Group is the parent company to some of the biggest names in fashion including Gucci, Alexander McQueen, and Yves Saint Laurent.

Many brands under the group have already pledged to drop fur with Gucci leading the way in 2017.

Gucci announced its fur-free policy after working with Humane Society International and the Humane Society of the United States.

Bottega Veneta followed suit shortly after in 2018, along with Alexander McQueen and Balenciaga who also made the decision to ditch fur earlier this year.

Yves Saint Laurent and Brioni were the last of Kering’s brands to use fur and are expected to go fur-free by 2022 in line with Kering Group’s announcement.

In making the announcement, chairman and CEO of Kering, Francois-Henri Pinault said: “Going entirely fur-free is just the right thing to do. We do it out of conviction, for the sake of ethics and modernity.”

The fashion giant’s move to go fur-free is just part of a wider sustainability pledge.

The fall of fur

Kering Group’s fur-free policy comes at a time when many fashion brands and retailers are moving away from fur in favour of cruelty-free alternatives that are better for animals and the planet.

In this year alone, Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue, Mytheresa, Canada Goose, Valentino, Oscar de la Renta, Tory Burch, Holt Renfrew, Mackage, Moose Knuckles, Alexander McQueen and Balenciaga have announced fur-free policies.

The announcement puts pressure on the few remaining fashion brands to sell fur to follow suit

Kitty Block, president of Humane Society International, said: “The future is clearly fur-free and now one of the world’s largest luxury fashion conglomerates agrees.

“As markets around the globe close their doors to fur products opting instead for innovative humane products, it makes complete sense for a power fashion house like Kering to make this ethical decision.

“We couldn’t be more proud of our long-standing relationship with Kering and its brands and look forward to continuing our work with them to pave the way for a kinder fashion world.”

PJ Smith, director of fashion policy for the Humane Society of the United States, said: “Kering is synonymous with luxury fashion, and with this announcement, it marks a new era for what is considered luxury to now include what is socially responsible, ethical and innovative.

“We hope the rest of the fashion industry will take notice choosing compassion and innovation over an outdated idea of luxury.”

Fur sales banned

Also in 2021, Israel became the first country to ban fur sales  to eradicate the sale of fur for fashion purposes.

Inspired by the historic move, the British government is also considering a fur import and sales ban in the coming months.

In the US, Ann Arbor, Michigan and Weston, Massachusetts also banned fur sales this year following California’s ban in 2019.

Already ditched fur? Read why down should be the next thing to exit your wardrobe, and what you can replace it with.

Photo credit: Pierre Verdy/AFP via Getty Images

Written by

Helen Greaves

Helen Greaves

Helen has been vegan since 2018 and has a background in vegan food marketing and social media. She's mother to a mischief of rats, and loves to spend her spare time making vegan cakes and bakes.

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